Workday – Reminder – Please Sign Up

This is a reminder – please let me know if you can help even for an hour or so. Volunteers on short notice to help finish clearing the Dancers Lane cycle path of bramble and black thorn. Your help is needed for Saturday, 23 March – please let me know if you can make it. We need 10 volunteers.

Tools
Herts County (HCC) Countryside & Rights of Way (CROW) will supply a van and driver with tools and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including gloves, eye protection (when cutting black thorn), hard hats and hi-vis jackets. Volunteers are requested to wear gardening clothes including long trousers and long-sleeved tops. You may want to bring your own garden gloves and tools such as secateurs, but they will be provided by HCC.

Task
There are around 50 metres of the path left to finish off which previous volunteers of CROW started. We will be checking the path the day before to ensure no birds are nesting – the Workday will need to be postponed if any birds are nesting.

Contact details
It is important if you are volunteering to send me your contact details, preferably a mobile number included in case I need to cancel everything the day before. You don’t have to be a member of the BCC, but we are unable to allow children of 16 years and under to help.

On the day
The Workday starts at 10:30 am with a brief explanation of H&S requirements and similar – we are working under HCC management and their insurances. All volunteers will need to conform to the conditions, which I understand include wearing a hi-vis jacket and hard hat and PPE depending on the job you may be doing. We will have to limit the number of volunteers to 10.

I’ll send more details to volunteers, but the tasks are generally to clip, lop, cut, rake and clear off the overgrown bramble and black thorn. It will take about 4 hours plus time for breaks including lunch.

Refreshments
Barnet Cyclists will cover the costs of sandwiches, coffees, etc. back at the S. Mimms Services, which is just up from the work area.

Access to the site
You are welcome to drive or cycle to the site. If driving, the HCC van driver will be able to open the Wash Lane gate and you should be able park on Wash Lane behind the services, since a 2-hour restriction applies in the S. Mimms services. I will send more details to the volunteers.

Volunteer!
Please email me (Subject heading: Workday) if you are able to help and provide your contact details.

Thanks

Charles

E-mail: info@barnetlcc.org

Barnet Cyclists Volunteers Needed Urgently, Saturday 23 March

I mentioned at the February meeting that Jon Crosby and I need volunteers on short notice to help finish clearing the Dancers Lane cycle path of bramble and black thorn. Your help is needed for Saturday, 23 March – please let me know if you can make it. We need 10 volunteers.

Tools
Herts County (HCC) Countryside & Rights of Way (CROW) will supply a van and driver with tools and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including gloves, eye protection (when cutting black thorn), hard hats and hi-vis jackets. Volunteers are requested to wear gardening clothes including long trousers and long-sleeved tops. You may want to bring your own garden gloves and tools such as secateurs, but they will be provided by HCC.

Task
There are around 50 metres of the path left to finish off which previous volunteers of CROW started. We will be checking the path the day before to ensure no birds are nesting – the Workday will need to be postponed if any birds are nesting.

Contact details
It is important if you are volunteering to send me your contact details, preferably a mobile number included in case I need to cancel everything the day before. You don’t have to be a member of the BCC, but we are unable to allow children of 16 years and under to help.

On the day
The Workday starts at 10:30 am with a brief explanation of H&S requirements and similar – we are working under HCC management and their insurances. All volunteers will need to conform to the conditions, which I understand include wearing a hi-vis jacket and hard hat and PPE depending on the job you may be doing. We will have to limit the number of volunteers to 10.

I’ll send more details to volunteers, but the tasks are generally to clip, lop, cut, rake and clear off the overgrown bramble and black thorn. It will take about 4 hours plus time for breaks including lunch.

Refreshments
I am asking if the BCC will cover the costs of sandwiches, coffees, etc. back at the S. Mimms Services, which is just up from the work area. I can confirm this in my email to volunteers.

Access to the site
You are welcome to drive or cycle to the site. If driving, the HCC van driver will be able to open the Wash Lane gate and you should be able park on Wash Lane behind the services, since a 2-hour restriction applies in the S. Mimms services. I will send more details to the volunteers.

Volunteer!
Please email me (Subject heading: Workday) if you are able to help and provide your contact details.

Thanks

Charles

E-mail: info@barnetlcc.org

Low Traffic Neighbourhoods – the time has come

Has the concept of the Low Traffic Neighbourhood reached a turning point that will see it going from a fringe idea to a national or international movement?  Will 90 years of car-oriented development now begin to be rolled back?  The 100 strong turn-out at the excellent UDG-London Living Streets event on 31 Jan 2019, attended by Peter Hale and Charles Harvey, would seem to suggest that the moment has come.

Chris Martin from Urban Movement opened the event by illustrating two diametrically different approaches to urban design, firstly, a road traffic interchange in Huston, Texas, and secondly the entire urban core of Florence, which would fit comfortably within it.   Points that he covered included the need to work with local people to identify and agree traffic cells, the connecting quiet streets, which streets will form the main traffic routes and which of these will need to be improved to become boulevards.   Providing safe crossings where the link streets cross main traffic routes was essential.

Feryal Demirci Deputy Mayor and Cabinet Member for Health, Social Care, Transport and Parks, Hackney talked about the challenges and progress being made in the borough.  Hackney was experiencing rapid population expansion, very poor air quality, congestion, obesity especially in young people, and yet it had low car ownership and over 15 percent of residents cycled to work.    Some streets in the borough had high cycle flows, with Goldsmith Road recording 6000 cyclists per day.  The borough was repurposing kerbside space, with cycle hangers and parklets.  Footways were being prioritised with both cycle hangers and electric vehicle charging points going in the carriageway not on the footway.  School Streets were being promoted, involving timed traffic restrictions around schools, backed by cameras and signs.  Traffic flows were typically half previous levels.   The borough was also introducing restrictions on all but ultra low emission vehicles.  As to low traffic neighbourhoods, over 100 streets had now been filtered.  She gave the impression that while there could be opposition from vehicle users from outside the area, local communities were strongly behind the introduction of schemes.  Play streets had been made much easier and less costly to introduce following creative use of the provisions of the Town Police Clauses Act 1847

Fran Graham from the London Cycling Campaign, argued that Low Traffic Neighbourhoods were an effective response to the impact of Satnav, Google maps, Waze etc which has led to increased through-traffic disrupting residential areas in the search for quicker, congestion free routes.  Turning to cycling, she indicated that traffic levels as low as 2000, 1500, or 1000 PCU per day were preferred to enable safe cycling  (PCU – Passenger Car Unit ) This is on a par with  Manual for Streets which cites 100 vehicles per hour peak flow as a threshold level below which pedestrians will share highway space with motorists, and above which they will tend to treat the general path taken by motor vehicles as a ‘road’ to be crossed rather than as a space to occupy.

Laurie Johnston, from the Dulwich Safe Routes to school campaign, observed that regrettably, responsibility for safety is placed on children, not on drivers. (NB research shows that children do not have the cognitive abilities to take responsibility, the law also recognises that they do not have the same capacity as adults). One street is not enough, she said, what is needed is a network of safe door to door routes

Rachel Aldred, for the University of Westminster discussed the research available to date.  The Mini Holland schemes had been assessed comparing areas with interventions with control areas where no changes had been made.  The results were positive with a notable increase in active travel in year 1, which continued into year 2 where there was a recorded reduction in car use. A scheme in Hounslow which involved no more than 2 planters had led new pedestrian and cycle journeys being made, amounting to a £500,000 health benefit.   There were Equality Act reasons for considering low traffic neighbourhoods.  The statistics showed that disabled pedestrians suffered  4-5 times more injuries from motor vehicles per kilometre than the general population.

In the discussion issues that came up included:

·         Traffic Evaporation or Traffic Displacement

·         Using ped-sheds to get a far more accurate view of walkability than just drawing a circle around a point.

·         Local community roadwatch groups to control speeding

·         Involve schools – at least one member of staff to be advocate

·         School streets are valuable but more is needed – children do more than just go to school.

·         Funding of Low Traffic Neighbourhoods – S106 funds can be a useful source

Further reading

Guide to Low Traffic Neighbourhoods

https://londonlivingstreets.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/lcc021-low-traffic-neighbourhoods-detail-v9.pdf

This publication provides plenty of detailed information on the physical measures that can be applied, as well as a series of steps to follow to take a scheme from an idea to a safer, cleaner, healthier and more social environment.

LB Barnet Draft (transport) Local Implementation Plan 3 2018-2041

This response to the consultation is from (Barnet Cyclists), the local borough group of London Cycling Campaign (LCC). We represent the interests of cyclists living or working in Barnet and aim to expand the opportunities for all to cycle safely in the borough.

Map-extract

The draft plan in its current form does not fully address the issues faced by Barnet, in particular the lack of safe space for cycling on direct routes and within neighbourhoods.

Our response identifies further challenges and opportunities, focuses on why the borough transport objectives are not sufficiently robust to achieve the desired shift to walking, cycling and public transport set by the Mayor’s Transport Strategy up to 2041, and suggests further measures and targets.

The consultation was published here: https://engage.barnet.gov.uk/Transport_Local_Plan

Our response focussed on four main topics:

  • Strategic Cycle Network
  • Liveable / Low Traffic Neighbourhoods
  • Behavioural Change
  • Additional Targets

Continue reading “LB Barnet Draft (transport) Local Implementation Plan 3 2018-2041”

Let Barnet Council know your views on transport

The council are gathering views until Sunday 9th December on what their transport priorities should be over the next 3 years and looking forward to 2041.

We ask you to view this important consultation and respond here: https://engage.barnet.gov.uk/Transport_Local_Plan

You may wish to focus on your top 3 priorities for your part of Barnet and what you would like to happen. Don’t be put off by the 110-page consultation document – a lot is just copied from the TfL strategy. Look in particular at the delivery plan starting on page 62 and the long terms aims on page 80 to see what they are actually proposing or not proposing.

We met council officials on 4th December and raised three main topics:

  • Strategic Cycle Network
  • Liveable / Low Traffic Neighbourhoods
  • Behavioural Change

You may have other priorities, but if you agree with these here are some bullet points to think about: Continue reading “Let Barnet Council know your views on transport”

An appeal to members in the southern part of the borough

We have been approached by an organisation called THOCH (The Hope of Childs Hill). It runs a bike project at Basing Hill Park (Between Wayside NW11 and the Hendon Way NW2) with professional instructors and help from local volunteers. It teaches basic cycling skills to both adults and children. Times are: 12-2 Saturdays and 2-4 Sundays. They would like help with basic cycle maintenance and leading easy local rides for adults.

Website: www.thoch.org.uk

For further information contact Anthony info@thoch.org.uk

I have done two sessions with them, so if you want a feel of what’s involved, please feel free to contact me charles.harvey@hotmail.co.uk

020 8455 5174 / 07961 194 771.

I feel it’s the sort of organisation Barnet Cyclists should be supporting. You wouldn’t be expected to make a regular commitment. You can turn up and help as and when you can.

Charles Harvey